NEWS22 June 2011

Choice and openness win web users round to behavioural ads – study

Privacy UK

UK— A study by online ad targeting firm Specific Media suggests consumers are willing to accept behavioural advertising as long as they are given proper information and the chance to opt out.

The firm’s qualitative study, based on 10 one-to-one interviews, found that consumers were less concerned about privacy than legislators and industry bodies, but that it was nonetheless important to give them choice, clarity and control.

Chris Worrell, European research manager at Specific Media, told Research: “It’s not a major issue for consumers. They’re relatively apathetic about the whole issue of privacy. We spoke to them about shopping online, details they share about themselves online through social networks and the role data plays in the advertising process, and to be honest, irrespective of the area you’re dealing with, consumers are fairly unfussed. People don’t worry about this stuff.”

Although part of this results from a lack of knowledge of what’s going on, Specific Media’s study found that when consumers did understand how cookies worked and what they were for, they were in favour of them, because “they could see that they were there to make internet browsing a more enjoyable experience,” said Worrell.

Worrell said advertisers should be upfront about the techniques and technologies they use to target content, and expressed support for the IAB’s self-regulatory initiative, under which targeted ads carry a clickable logo allowing web users to find out more information and opt out if they choose to.

@RESEARCH LIVE

3 Comments

9 years ago

Are you telling me that they spent the money to survey 10 actual individual people? That is 1 with a zero after it? Did they need to leave their corporate office to field such a wide survey?! INCREDIBLE! I mean I just did "one-to-one interviews" with my dog, my cat, my wife, my son and my ficus, and while that may only be 50% as relevant, they seemed to be of the opinion that there continues to be a significant failure in transparency with online data collection practices. The dog and the ficus both thought that even new enhanced notice fails in both scope of covered practices and scope of covered parties. The ficus can be a little overly analytical at times.

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9 years ago

Chris Worrell has either managed to select a portion of the population that agrees with him or has completely failed to conduct a fair and balanced survey. To say that 'people don't worry about this stuff' is completely and utterly untrue and incorrect. People don't _understand_ this stuff. There is a significant difference. This is not research. It's biased PR fodder.

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9 years ago

Apologies but headlines that read, "study suggests" seriously damages Research-Live's credibility when the *study* was 10 people and conducted by an extremely biased party.

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