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NEWS15 July 2014

Scottish parties split over impact of ‘Yes’ vote on charities

Charities News UK

UK — The vast majority ( 19 out of 20 ) of SNP MSPs think Scottish independence would have a positive impact for charities, but seven out of 15 Labour and four out of six Conservative MSPs surveyed by nfpSynergy raised concerns that charity funding in Scotland would be adversely affected by independence.

Meanwhile, the Scottish public are uncertain of the implications for charities of an independent Scotland, with 26% thinking charities’ future would be ‘less certain’. Almost a third ( 30%) said they ‘didn’t know’ what impact Scottish independence would have on charities, pressure groups or voluntary organisations while 23% agreed that ‘charities could be better placed to meet the needs of Scottish people’.

NfpSynergy’s report ‘Walking the Tightrope — five recommendations for charities to engage with Scotland’s changing future’, is based on surveys of 50 MSPs and 1,000 adults in Scotland.

It recommends charities should ask tough questions of politicians about how they will be affected; stay impartial; work together; prepare a contingency plan for independence and greater devolution and make policy recommendations on how areas of concern could be addressed.  

NfpSynergy’s head of professional audiences, Tim Harrison, said: “Whichever way the Scottish people vote on September 18th, Scotland will be a different country post-referendum. With the main political parties (excluding SNP) advocating new powers for Holyrood should Scotland vote no, charities need to be prepared to work with a Scottish government that will have more power and autonomy.”   

@RESEARCH LIVE

1 Comment

5 years ago

The charity I manage sources over 40% of its funding from English trusts & foundations, and another 10-20% from UK bodies which would be broken up on independence. I don't think there would be an immediate change in trusts' funding policies, but in the longterm Scotland would become much less of a priority for them.

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