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NEWS10 May 2011

Salama reshuffles TNS management, takes over as CEO

North America People

US— Kantar CEO Eric Salama has reshuffled the senior management of group company TNS, naming himself chief executive while moving Pedro Ros to the role of non-executive chairman.

Salama (pictured) said the changes were made in a bid to improve the company’s performance across the board.

He said: “It’s a matter of not being satisfied with OK [performance]. The business is stable but not performing at the top of its game in some markets.

“Overall,” he said, “the potential is greater than what is being shown to clients.”

Ros, who Salama replaces, was made CEO of TNS in early 2009 when Kantar merged the newly-acquired business with Research International. In his new role of non-executive chairman Ros will focus on developing relationships with specific clients and with other WPP and Kantar companies to “ensure that capabilities are in place” to deliver successful work for customers.

In turn, Ros replaces Jamie Hall, who will leave the business “as planned” at an unspecified point this year. Hall was previously TNS CEO for the Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa (APMEA) region but was named chairmanwhen TNS split the APMEA region in two late last year.

Salama said: “I would like to take the opportunity to thank Pedro for steering TNS and Research International through a difficult period of integration during 2009, a period which is now well behind us, and for doing it with considerable skill and a commitment second-to-none. 

“I am delighted that TNS will continue to benefit from his abilities. And I would like to thank Jamie Hall for a magnificent long career which has spanned time with NFO, TNS and now Kantar. His abilities, approach and humour will be missed.”

@RESEARCH LIVE

1 Comment

8 years ago

Shuffling only the top might not help. As a former client of TNS, I know they can definitely up the game. The significant churn they face usually results in the better employees moving out, and little is done to retain them. (perhaps they need to invest in employee satisfaction and retention research themselves) Just reviewing the top departures in the last couple of years can guide them on improving policy. That should be the focus for TNS, especially in its developing markets.

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